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Book Reviews: All the Good Things by Clare Fisher

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Beth has done a bad, bad thing. And while she ruminates about the tragedy she brought on herself while paying the ultimate price, she goes on a journey of healing and redemption.

In Clare Fisher’s novel All the Good Things, Beth is seeing a counselor while serving a prison term. Convinced she is completely worthless, Beth’s counselor, with both compassion and wisdom, tells her to write a list of all the good things that have to her.

This is pretty difficult for Beth. In her young life, Beth has dealt with tragedy, abandonment, and heartbreak. Among these include being deserted by her mother, mental health issues, abusive relationships, one crappy job after another, and a series of dreadful foster homes.

But as she looks back on her life, Beth remembers the things. She’s very creative, she has a network of supportive friends, she’s felt the embrace of true love, and her sweet baby girl who she loves with great intensity.

Beth writes this list in a journal form that comes across like a series of letters to her daughter. And as he writes these letters she comes to terms with the lowest moments in her life, the moments that gave her life purpose, and one horrible mistake that altered her life. Now she’s asking herself is she can be forgiven and can she be redeemed?

All the Good Things kept me riveted, page after page. Beth’s story both broke my heat and uplifted my spirits.

Fisher’s debut novel is written with a great deal of clarity that fulfills all the senses. Beth is written as a fully-dimensional character, as are the tertiary characters.

Obviously I’m not going to reveal why Beth is being punished and in prison. But you just might gasp out loud when she admits her crime…like I did.

Book Marks

  1. Laundromat libraries in Milwaukee. 
  2. Check’em out: Shelf Unbound Magazine.
  3. Mark Ruffalo gives us the “story behind the story” when it comes to his latest release.
  4. Twitter’s #DVpit creates a place for diversity in publishing.
  5. The Nobel Prize for Literature goes to two controversial writers.
  6. Children’s book author kills family and himself.
  7. Wham’s Andrew Ridgeley pays tribute to the late George Michael in his new book.
  8. Slate wonders who are feminist baby books for?
  9. Fifteen books marriage therapists suggest to their married clients.
  10. These are the women have have won the Nobel Prize for Literature.
  11. The Book Prize goes to Margaret Atwood and Bernadine Evaristo.
  12. Hatchette Book Group (HBG) launches HPGo.

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