Book Marks

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Don’t forget. It’s Indie Book Store Day!!!

How to find out which book charity is right for you.

How some poets are elevating the art of poetry.

Prince’s memoir, The Beautiful Ones, to come out this fall.

Three women on the future of what we will read.

Pulitzer Prize winners of 2019.

Quiet author (and fellow introvert) Susan Cain on the book that changed her life.

Write that novel! Some hints on starting chapter one.

Human garbage, Aaron Clarey, is still telling his leg humpers to cheat through Academic Composing. Meanwhile, grifter and charlatan, Penelope Trunk is “teaching” a class on writing.Meanwhile, grifter and charlatan, Penelope Trunk is “teaching” a class on writing.

What the lovely ladies of Feministing are reading this month.What the lovely ladies of Feministing are reading this month.

Book Review: Leading from the Roots-Nature-Inspired Leadership Lessons for Today’s World by Dr. Kathleen E. Allen

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“Leadership today is about unlearning management and relearning being human.” – Javier Pladevall, CEO of Volkswagen Audi Retail

You know I like a book when I mark it up with post-its, write notes in the margins, highlight certain passages and nod my head along like one of those bobble-head figurines. Which is exactly what I did while reading Dr. Kathleen E. Allen’s fascinating, timely and revolutionary’s book Leading from the Roots: Nature-Inspired Leadership Lessons for Today’s World.

This book implores organizational leaders (and pretty much anyone else with a stake in the workplace) to look beyond the confines of the physical spaces where we toil to nature and how it can help us and our companies thrive.

Leading from the Roots is divided into 11 well-researched,  and finely-written chapters on concepts like cooperation, diversity, lack of waste, curbing excess, the power of limits and so much more.

Each chapter gives ample evidence on how nature can help worker’s productivity and commitment to their jobs and how simple it is to work these practices into the workplace that won’t break the bank, take up too much time, or distract us from our tasks at hand. Dr. Allen provides ample evidence through both her extensive end notes and bibliography. And each chapter concludes with a summary of the chapter’s main focus and points to ponder and discuss.

Simply put, Leading from the Roots inspired me. Dr. Allen’s lessons are doable, practical and very audience-friendly. It’s ideal for everyone-managers, workers, students and grads, religious leaders, politicians, activists, teachers, creative types, social workers, medical personal, entrepreneurs, and so on.

Leading from the Roots is a great addition to my book shelf. I highly suggest you add it to your book shelf.

Book Review: Seduction-New Poems, 2013-2018 by Quincy Troupe

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For the most part, I’m a pretty fearless reader. I’m open to all kinds of genres.

But when it comes to poetry, I’m a total ‘fraidy cat.

Oh, sure, as a child I loved the playful poems of Dr. Seuss and Shel Silverstein. And once I became an adult, I embraced the poetry of Dorothy Parker, Maya Angelou, and Sylvia Plath. I also fully realize the lyrics of my favorite songs are poetry.

But unfortunately I ignore poetry when it comes to reading.  I’m too intimidated, thinking I won’t get it or the poems will go over my head.

Well, no more. It’s time to stop being a baby and start reading poetry. And I am happy I did because poetry has opened a new world to me thanks to Quincy’s book Seduction: New Poems, 2013-2018.

Mr. Troupe has written nine books of poetry and he’s also an author and screenwriter.

Seduction is a slim volume divided into three parts consisting of poems that speak of topics like race, love, sex, culture, black icons, societal issues, and the human condition as whole.

Some of Troupe’s poems are short, several are quite lengthy, almost like short stories. Some of these longer poems are broken into chapters, which is something I had never seen until I read Troupe’s work.

As for his shorter poems? Well, Troupe’s poetry convey more than 500 page novels.

Troupe is both a challenging and visionary writer, with a game changing use of the English language. One way Troupe does this is replacing “I” with “Eye. ” He also has creative and descriptive style of writing. I could actually visualize his poems in my mind’s eye.

I’m thrilled I chose to read Troupe’s book Seduction. It has definitely lessened my fear of poetry and has seduced me to read more.

 

 

Book Marks

1. Pulitzer Prize winners announced.

2. This boy reads how many books a day?

3. Creative people and their problems with networking.

4. Michelle Obama throws Trump some epic shade.

5. Fourteen must-reads from the Mueller Report.

6. Twenty-five facts about libraries.

7. For teen poets, poetry is activism.

8. Former New Yorker copy editor, Mary Norris, on furnishing an apartment inspired by books.

9. Book sellers tell us the proper manners when attending a used book sale.

10. Why writing is about courage.

 

Book Marks

1. Emilio Estevez on libraries.

2. Banned Books Week’s plans for 2019.

3. Non-fiction books to read this spring according to Bitch Media.

4. How shame affects your writing.

5. This series of books discusses your favorite pop culture characters.

6. Relic of the 80s, Bret Easton  Ellis,  thinks we’re overreacting when it comes to Trump.

7. Bennington College granted 4 million dollars to support poetry.

8. Seven year old girl becomes a published author and aspires to be a barista.

9. Anti-Dr. Laura letter still funny nearly 20 years after it was published.

10. A-list, Oscar-winner Julianne Moore discusses adapting Gloria Steinem’s memoir, My Life on the Road, to film.

Book Review: The Little Red Book of Poe-ee-tree-Words from the Heart edited by Mrs. Fields


Note: Over 10 years ago I reviewed this book for a U2 fansite. In honor of Poetry month, I decided to dust it off, make a few revisions, and publish it here at The Book Self.

U2 fans are not your typical rock and roll fans. Sure, they buy the CDs, download their music, and go to the concerts, but being a U2 fan is so much more than that. U2 fans are motivated. They are inspired to open their minds, learn new things, and get involved in causes bigger than themselves. However, they are also inspired to use own creativity. This is evident in a slim, yet powerful book of poetry and short stories called The Little Red Book of Poet-ee-tree: Words from the Heart.

The Little Red Book of Poe-ee-tree is a volume containing heartfelt prose by a collection of U2 fans throughout the globe. Their love of U2’s music and the written word lead these fans to The Heart. The Heart was an Internet poetry forum where writers cultivated their writing skills, shared their work with others, and got their creative juices flowing. Sadly, it shut down in 2003, but fortunately for the Heart community, U2 fans, and lovers of good writing, the works created for the Heart are not lost forever. They are compiled into The Little Red Book of Poe-ee-tree.

All the royalties of The Little Red Book of Poe-ee-tree went to the African Well Fund, a charity founded in 2002 by a group of U2 fans to provide a clean water sources to many African communities. The African Well Fund has built and supplied clean water and sanitation projects in Uganda, Angola and Zimbabwe. The Little Red Book of Poe-ee-tree was just one part of the African Well Fund’s comprehensive vision to help others.

The poets published in The Little Red Book of Poe-ee-tree write about love and loss, heartbreak and joy. They write with clear-eyed optimism and downcast despair. These poems take us on a journey of both the writers’ hearts and souls, and our individual interpretations to their work. Some poems a mere few lines, whereas others nearly tell a story.

Jennifer’s startling “Modern Day Warfare” uses the frightening images of mustard-gas lies and biological-warfare thoughts, along with rat-ta-tat fists to chillingly describe abuse both emotional and physical.

Kel, in the poem “Africa” describes the continent as a living, breathing human female, inhaling her warm earthy air. This poem puts a very personal face on one’s personal journey throughout the African landscape.

Mrs. F. conveys the love a mother has for her children in the poem “Earth and Angels.” Phrases like “He darts in dizzy zig zags…Listens wide-eyed, hoots at the owl” and “Head filled with fairies and music…She skips and sings” give us an intimate look at the special qualities that make our sons and daughters so special to us.

All the poems, whether short or lengthy, are very strong, and open to many interpretations. I don’t know how these poets came to their words. Sometimes a poem just comes to someone and easily flows out onto paper. Sometimes constructing a poem is like throwing a bunch of words into the air, and then constructing a poem using the scattered words. However the poems came to be in this book, they came through what Allen Ginsberg once called, “ordinary magic.”

Several short stories are also collected in The Little Red Book of Poe-ee-tree. When writing a short story, writers also face challenges. Writers need to grab the reader and tell a complete story in a short amount of words. And these stories have to be engaging, draw the reader in, and achieve a believable conclusion without seeming to be tacked on in haste.

This is expertly done in Laurie CK’s “Pennycake.” In this story, carefree memories of a 1970’s childhood are recalled with its birthday rituals and lazy summer days. The brief mentions of Noxzema, Keith Partridge, and 8-Track tapes give the reader a strong idea of a certain place in time. This story also evokes what it is like to be a child facing real life unexpected grief and a subsequent loss of faith.

The one quibble I do have with this book (and it is a minor one) is the limited amount of writers. I don’t know if this is because only a few writers were accepted or only a few writers chose to submit their work. This could also be because the Heart was a small group to begin with. If anything this book begs for a sequel.