Book Marks

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The late Prince’s memoirs are to be published shortly.

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Publisher Weekly’s Guide to the books of summer 2018.

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Thirteen signs you shouldn’t sign a publishing deal or take on a freelance assignment.

 

 

 

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Book Review: Delivering Virtue by Brian Kindall

It’s 1854. Some people would call Didier Rain a foolish rake with a sinful desire for both liquor and women of ill-repute. Didier would prefer if people considered him a gentleman poet and true bon vivant, a lover of the finer things in life. No matter what, Didier is the unlikely hero of Brian Kindall’s delicious mix of western and fairy tale in the novel Delivering Virtue.

Didier is chosen by a secretive Mormon sect to be a Sacred Deliverer of an angel haired baby girl named Virtue to the bride of the Prophet Nehi in the City of Rocks. Didier knows very little about taking care of babies but after being offered a princely sum of $30,000 Didier is only too happy to take on this task. How hard could it be? Didier is about to find out.

Outfitted with a few supplies and completely in over his head, Didier faces challenging enemies and encounters who want nothing more than to keep Didier from completing his colossal journey. But he also meets true allies like a Native American woman whose lactating breasts keep Virtue fed and growing oddly at a very fast rate. And all of these elements make Delivering Virtue one heck of a tale, with twists and turns that kept me riveted.

Are some of Didier’s actions a bit questionable? Well, yes. A lot of people wouldn’t approve his love of booze and brothels. But for the most Didier’s heart is in the right place and as Delivering Virtue unfolds you view Didier as a man of honor, a true hero, even if this knight in shining armor has a few rusty spots.

Delivering Virtue is hard to sum up in a review. My only advice is read it to fully capture it fantastical tale is a delicious blend of Louis L’Amour western, Brother’s Grimm fairy tale, Tim Burton film that hasn’t made its way to the silver screen and one really weird LSD trip (not that I know what an LSD trip is like).

Author Kindall has a magical way with words. His prose has a visionary quality; he truly shows while he tells this story. His use of dialogue is funny, thoughtful, bawdy and entirely entertaining. Every single character in Delivering Virtue is necessary and intriguing who move the story forward and the book closes with a fully-satisfying denouement.

If you’re wondering why I haven’t given the plot of Delivering Virtue away too much in this review it’s because I believe it needs to be read to be truly enjoyed. I can’t truly sum this book up in one little review. I want the reader to experience the book like I did.

Though I finished reading Delivering Virtue a few weeks ago; it is still with me. I think it would make a great film and I keep thinking of actors who would make the perfect Didier (sadly, Paul Newman is no longer with us). 2018 isn’t even half-way over, and already Delivering Virtue is one of the best books I’ve read this year. And I do hope it’s not the only adult-oriented book Brian Kindall has in him (he’s written several books for young adults). He’s immensely talented and I hope for more great work from him. He’s definitely a writer to watch out for.

Book Marks

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Michigan teen starts book subscription service.

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13 books you might want to check out this month.

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Author Anita Shreve dies at 71 years old.

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Apparently Sean Penn wrote a novel and it sucks.

Brag Book

 

Wonderful news. Paul Schroeder who wrote the book Practice Makes Purpose sent out a PR related email and it found its way into my email queue. In this email he praised my review of his book:

“Lastly, The Book Self Blog recently posted a review of Practice Makes PURPOSE. I’m grateful to Bookish Jen for her thoughtful review (read an excerpt below). Jen has lots of interesting reviews of other books that readers may find interesting. I encourage you to visit her blog and look around.”

He also provided a link to my blog via this email. How lovely of you, Mr. Schroeder. I can’t thank you enough.

Book Marks

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Singer Mary Lambert to publish book of her poetry.

Not yet published, James Comey’s book is at the top of best seller lists. top of best seller lists.

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Author John Boyne’s beautiful Dublin home is a reader’s dream!

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Writer’s Block

So sorry about my absence from writing for this blog, but things got rather busy with my birthday and other craziness. I’ve been overwhelmed with the amount of books writers want me to read and review. I must admit, it is very flattering. I’m thrilled these writers value my opinion.

However, I am going to take a brief break from reading and reviewing to focus on some other things in the upcoming weeks. I do need the rest and this rest will help re-energize me so I can continue to read books and review them. Thanks for your understanding. You’re the best.

 

Brag Book


I have some wonderful news and perfect for today is my birthday. Judy Martialay, author of Bonjour! Let’s Learn French loved my review of her book she wants to quote it for promotional purposes. I’m thrilled!!!!

Merci beaucoup, Judy!!!

Bonjour! Let’s Learn French-Visit New Places and Make New Friends by Judy Martialay

I usually don’t review children’s books, so I was a bit surprised when writer, illustrator and educator Judy Martialay sought me out to review her book Bonjour! Let’s Learn French. But being a bit of a Francophile and having a niece and nephew who are currently attending a French immersion school, Martialay’s request piqued my interest so I accepted her offer

Bonjour! Let’s Learn French follows the adventures of world traveler Pete the Pilot. Wherever he travels Pete learns the country’s language, so he can better communicate with a country’s citizens and make new friends. In this book Pete finds himself on a French beach where he meets several children and a certain snail named Louis l’escargot. This story is written in English with several key words within the story translated to French, including words like sand, beach, castle, children, which are in bold type. Though the story is quite short it packs in a lot of basic French translations children can recite as a parent reads to them or the child can read him or herself.

But Bonjour! Let’s Learn French offers a great deal more than a short story with English to French translations. It also offers quite a few activities that also help children learn French words and phrases. They include a skit which parents can play out with their children or can be done as a classroom activity. Another activity asks children to look at various people and objects within the book, their home and neighborhoods and translate them to French.

The musically inclined will enjoy a French song in the book and the artsy set will discover their inner Monet or Renoir have fun making their own impressionistic painting, both activities fully explained in the book.

And for convenience sake, Martialay provides a glossary of French to English translations at the end of the book just in case.

Interspersed throughout! Let’s Learn French are Martialay’s cute illustrations and various photographs of people, places and things one might find during a French holiday, including the buildings, art work, the French flag, cafes, and one of my personal favorites, French cuisine, including French onion soup and various French pastries like croissants.

Bonjour! Let’s Learn is for children ages six through 12. Though I think some older children might consider this book to be a bit babyish if they’ve been studying French since they were very little like my niece and nephew. However, I think it’s an ideal book for children learning French for the first time and it’s a way to bond with their parents, too. And, no parents, you don’t have to be fluent in French.

As for school teachers, I think a lot of them will welcome a book like Bonjour! Let’s Learn French in their classrooms, whether the French language is a part of their curriculum or not. We live in a very global world and a book that not only teaches children a foreign language but also about a foreign culture can only be an asset to their learning.